1. Home
  2. |  
  3. Civil Services |  

IAS Prelims Exam: Ancient History NCERT Questions: The Geographical Background of Indian History

Apr 29, 2016 16:42 IST

    Old edition of NCERT Books are still high in demand in terms of UPSC IAS Exam Preparation because it has extensive coverage of the topics given in the UPSC IAS Exam syllabus. The IAS aspirants find it difficult to get an old edition NCERT book from market due to its unavailability in the market.

    Here, we have provided Multiple Choice Questions of Ancient Indian History which have been created from the old edition of NCERT book, go and check your level of your Preparation of IAS Prelims Exam.

    1. Ancient times the whole mass of land of India was known as________.

    a. Bharata
    b. Sampoorna Bharat
    c. Bharatavarsha
    d. None of the above

    Answer: c

    Explanation: In ancient times the whole mass of land, currently India, Pakistan and Bangladesh, was known as Bharatavarsha or Hindustan, the latter is derived from the name of the river Sindhu, pronounced by the westerners as Hindu or Indu. India gets its derivation from this. In our constitution it is called India, that is Bharata.

    2. Consider the following statements regarding India and its subcontinents:

    I. At present there are six countries in this area: Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nepal, India, Bhutan and Bangladesh.
    II. India is bordered in the north by the Himalyas, the western and north-western side by Pamir plateau and Sulaiman-Kirthar ranges, on the eastern side by the Bay of Bengal and western side by the Arabian Sea.
    III. Southern borders are bounded by Indian Ocean.

    Which of the following statement(s) is/are correct?

    a. Only I
    b. I and II
    c. II and III
    d. All of the above

    Answer: d

    Explanation: At present there are six countries in this area: Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nepal, India, Bhutan and Bangladesh. India is bordered in the north by the Himalayas, the western and north-western side by Pamir plateau and Sulaiman Kirthar ranges, on the eastern side by the Bay of Bengal and western side by the Arabian Sea. Southern borders are bounded by Indian Ocean. Physically the subcontinent can be studied in three parts: (i) The Himalayas, (ii) The Indo-Gangetic-Brahmaputra plain (iii) The Deccan plateau.

    3. Consider the following statements regarding the Himalayas:

    I. The Himalayas are stretched from Afghanistan in the west upto Myanmar in the east.
    II. The Himalaya is more than 2,400 Kms long and about 250 to 320 kms wide.
    III. Some of the highest peaks are: Gauri Shankar or Everest (the highest mountain in the world), Kanchanjanga, Dhaulagiri, Nanga Parvat and Nanda Devi.

    Which of the following statement(s) is/are correct?

    a. Only I
    b. I and II
    c. II and III
    d. All of the above

    Answer: d

    Explanation: The Himalayas are stretched from Afghanistan in the west upto Myanmar in the east. The Tibetan plateau forms the northern part of it. It is more than 2,400 Kms long and about 250 to 320 kms wide. There are about 114 peaks which are more than 20,000 feet high. Some of the highest peaks are: Gauri Shankar or Everest (the highest mountain in the world), Kanchanjanga, Dhaulagiri, Nanga Parvat and Nanda Devi.

    4. Which of the following hills of Indian-subcontinent is not located on the eastern side of India?

    a. Safed Koh hills
    b. Jaintiya hills
    c. Garo hills
    d. Patkoi hills

    Answer: a

    Explanation: On the eastern side are the Patkoi hills, Naga hills, the Manipur Plateau including the Khasi, Garo and Jaintia hills. The Lushai and Chin hills are to the south of Manipur.The mountains of Safed Koh, Sulaiman and Kirthar separate Iran from the Indian subcontinent.

    5. Consider the following statements regarding the significance of the Himalayas:

    I. The Himalayas form a formidable barrier against the foreign invasions from the north but it is not altogether secluded from the rest of the world.
    II. There are some important passes in Himalayas through which interaction with western, central and northern Asia has been maintained since time immemorial.
    III. Besides guarding the northern frontier of India from human invasions the Himalayas protect us from the cold Siberian winds.

    Which of the following statement(s) is/are correct?

    a. Only I
    b. I and II
    c. II and III
    d. All of the above

    Answer: d

    Explanation: The Himalayas form a formidable barrier against the foreign invasions from the north but it is not altogether secluded from the rest of the world. There are some important passes through which interaction with western, central and northern Asia has been maintained since time immemorial. It is said that 'since early Siwalik times there has been a more or less constant intercourse between East Africa, Arabia, Central Asia and India maintained by the migrations of herds of mammals'. It is also stated that (India) 'received large accessions by migration of the larger quadrupeds from Egypt, Arabia, Central Asia, and even from the distant North America by way of land bridges across Alaska, Siberia and Mongolia'. Besides guarding the northern frontier of India from human invasions the Himalayas protect us from the cold Siberian winds. The great Indus, Ganga and Brahmaputra plains with most fertile land, natural resources and perennial rivers is a gift of the Himalayas, for which Indians gratefully worship it as God.

    6. From the ancient period, which of the following mountain passes known as the gateway of India?

    a. Khyber and Bolan passes
    b. Khrdung La pass
    c. Nathu La pass
    d. Mana pass

    Answer: a

    Explanation: It is said that 'since early Siwalik times there has been a more or less constant intercourse between East Africa, Arabia, Central Asia and India maintained by the migrations of herds of mammals'. It is also stated that (India) 'received large accessions by migration of the larger quadrupeds from Egypt, Arabia, Central Asia, and even from the distant North America by way of land bridges across Alaska, Siberia and Mongolia'. Human migration is also possible on these routes. In historical times the use of the Khyber and Bolan passes in the west is well known. Among these, the use of the former was very frequent and is known as the gateway to India.

    7. Consider the following statements regarding the Indo-Gangetic-Brahmaputra Plain:

    I. To the south of the Himalayas lies the great Indo-Gangetic-Brahmaputra Plain of India which is more than 3200 kms long and about 240 kms to 320 kms broad.
    II. It is formed by the solid waste of the Himalayas brought by hundreds of descending streams.
    III. The alluvium formed from the waste of the Himalayas made the plains most fertile.

    Which of the following statement(s) is/are correct?

    a. Only I
    b. I and II
    c. II and III
    d. All of the above

    Answer: d

    Explanation: To the south of the Himalayas lies the great plain of India which is more than 3200 kms long and about 240 kms to 320 kms broad. It is formed by the solid waste of the Himalayas brought by hundreds of descending streams. The alluvium thus formed made the plains most fertile. There are three great river systems, originating from the Himalayas, which supply perennial water to this great plain.

    8. Which of the following rivers is not originating from the Himalayas?

    a. Ganga
    b. Sutlej
    c. Ymuna
    d. Indus

    Answer: b

    Explanation: There are three great river systems, originating from the Himalayas, which supply perennial water to this great plain. These are the Indus, the Ganga and the Brahmaputra. But a big tract of land to the west of Yamuna and east of Indus in this plain is devoid of any water system at present. This tract includes the states of Haryana, Punjab and Rajasthan. Now it has been proved that in ancient times the river Saraswati and its tributaries used to flow in this area.

    9. Consider the following statements regarding the river Sindhu or Indus:

    I. The Indus originates from the Kailasa Manasarovar area in the Tibetan plateau, runs west and northwest for about 1300 Kms, between the Karakoram range.
    II. After joined by the Gilgit river, it turns south and reaches the plains where the five rivers join it to form Panchananda desha or Punjab.
    III. The five tributaries of the Sindhu from east to west are: the Sutlej (Satudri), the Beas (Vipasa), the Ravi (Parushm), the Chenab (Asikni) and the Jhelum (Vitesta).

    Which of the following statement(s) is/are correct?

    a. Only I
    b. I and II
    c. II and III
    d. All of the above

    Answer: d

    Explanation: The Sindhu or Indus rises from the Kailasa Manasarovar area in the Tibetan plateau, runs west and northwest for about 1300 Kms, between the Karakoram range. Then joined by the Gilgit river, it turns south and reaches the plains where the five rivers join it to form Panchananda desha or Punjab. These five tributaries of the Sindhu from east to west are: the Sutlej (Satudri), the Beas (Vipasa), the Ravi (Parushm), the Chenab (Asikni) and the Jhelum (Vitesta). The first mentioned river, Sutlej or Satudri was once a tributary of the lost river Saraswati, but changed its course.

    10. Consider the following statements regarding the river Ganga:

    I. The Ganga, rising from the Himalayas, reaches the plain at Hardwar and passes through the states of Uttaranchal, Uttar Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, Bihar, Jharkhand and Bengal, then joins the Bay of Bengal.
    II. On the west of Ganga, flows the river Yamuna also rising from the Himalayas.
    III. Some Vindhyan rivers like the Chambal, the Betwa and the Ken join the Yamuna before its confluence with the Ganga at Allahabad.

    Which of the following statement(s) is/are correct?

    a. Only I
    b. I and II
    c. II and III
    d. All of the above

    Answer: c

    Explanation: The Ganga, rising from the Himalayas, reaches the plain at Hardwar and passes through the states of Uttaranchal, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar and Bengal, then joins the Bay of Bengal. On the west of it flows the river Yamuna also rising from the Himalayas. Some Vindhyan rivers like the Chambal, the Betwa and the Ken join the Yamuna before its confluence with the Ganga at Allahabad.

    Click here for the History Study Material

    Register to get FREE updates

      All Fields Mandatory
    • (Ex:9123456789)
    • Please Select Your Interest
    • Please specify

    • ajax-loader
    • A verifcation code has been sent to
      your mobile number

      Please enter the verification code below

    This website uses cookie or similar technologies, to enhance your browsing experience and provide personalised recommendations. By continuing to use our website, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Cookie Policy. OK
    X

    Register to view Complete PDF