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Tribal Language Books to be Introduced in Odisha Schools

In order to check the number of dropout students, especially among the tribal students, some of the Primary Schools in Koraput district of Odisha have introduced a set of seven story books in tribal languages with Odia translation.

Aug 17, 2015 17:34 IST
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In order to check the number of dropout students, especially among the tribal students, some of the Primary Schools in Koraput district of Odisha have introduced a set of seven story books in tribal languages with Odia translation. The books have been launched in Kuvi, Gadaba and Paraja languages and are translated in Odia in few schools of Pottangi block of Koraput district.

The step is taken in order to curb the dropout rate among tribal students and promote the method of multilingual teaching from the very primary level. According to Sanjit Patnaik, Secretary of Voluntary organization SOVA which has prepared the text books, “Most of the students at primary school level face difficulty in understanding Odia and drop out.” The Delhi based organization NEG-Fire has also helped in preparing the books in multilingual form.

In order to make it easier for the students to understand and make it interesting the books have taken the form of pictorial conversation and presentation methods. It has included tribal folklore with Odia translation to make the students aware of the issue more potently. Pattnaik further added, “Earlier, we had prepared word books in tribal languages with Odia translation and introduced them in 34 primary schools in Pottangi block. The result was very encouraging. The word books helped the tribal children learn fast.”

This would help the tribal students to grapple their education in their own language as they grow up in the lap of nature. According to district welfare officer of Koraput, Trinath Rao, “We have introduced multi-lingual method of teaching in at least three residential schools for SC and students. We plan to introduce it in other schools, which have around 70 to 90 percent monolingual tribal students.”

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