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NASA's Apollo 11 Moon Landing Space Mission: Google Doodle Celebrates 50th Anniversary

NASA's Apollo 11 Moon Landing Space Mission - 50th Anniversary: Google honoured the 50th Anniversary of NASA's Apollo 11 Moon Landing with a Google Doodle on its home page. Check details.
Jul 19, 2019 18:01 IST
Google Doodle - NASA's Apollo 11 Moon Mission

NASA's Apollo 11 Space Mission - 50th Anniversary: Google honoured the 50th Anniversary of NASA's Apollo 11 Moon Landing with a Google Doodle. On the homepage of Google.com, as you will click on an interactive button, an animated video will pop up showing lift-off of NASA's rocket, used in the Apollo 11 moon mission. In this video, Mike Collins, one of the Astronauts of NASA's Apollo 11 mission, sharing the details and his experience, during the mission. 

Apollo 11 was launched on July 16, 1969. It carried three astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins. Out of three, the two astronauts, Neil Armstrong & Buzz Aldrin landed on the moon on July 20, 1969.

Google Doodle Celebrates 50th Anniversary of NASA's Apollo 11 Moon Landing Space Mission:

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Apollo 11 was launched Cape Kennedy. It carried Commander Neil Armstrong, Command Module Pilot Michael Collins and Lunar Module Pilot Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin.  Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, both landed the Apollo Lunar Module Eagle on July 20, 1969. Whereas, Michael Collins stayed in the orbit 60 miles above them in the command module.

The main objective of Apollo 11 was to perform a crewed lunar landing and return to Earth, a national goal set by  John F. Kennedy when he was the president of the USA.

Neil  Armstrong became the first person to step onto the surface of the moon followed by Aldrin, who joined him 19 minutes later. 

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Here is the latest tweet from NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration)

"Landing on the Moon took bravery, nerve and... new math! To do it, we invented powerful equations that helped computers of the era process vast amount of data. Today, this approach is used across our lives, including directing air traffic in our busy skies", tweeted NASA.

NASA Latest Tweet: Moon Mission