Malwa Deccan and Jaunpur schools of painting

17-AUG-2012 12:21

     

     

    Malwa, Deccan and Jaunpur schools of painting
    A new trend in manuscript illustration was set by a manuscript of the Nimatnama painted at Mandu, during the reign of Nasir Shah. This represent a synthesis of the indigenous and the Persian style, though it was the latter which dominated the Mandu manuscripts. There was another style of painting known as Lodi Khuladar that flourished in the Sultanate's dominion of North India extending from Delhi to Jaunpur.
    Malwa  
    Malwa  paintings show a fondness for rigorously flat compositions, black and chocolate-brown backgrounds, figures shown against a solid colour patch, and architecture painted in lively colour. The school’s most appealing features are a primitive charm and a simple childlike vision.
    Some of the important paintings executed in the Malwa style are a series of the Rasikapriya dated 1634 A.D., a series of the Amaru Sataka painted in 1652 A.D. at a place called Nasratgarh and a series of the Ragamala painted in 1680 A.D. by an artist named Madhau Das, at Narsyanga Shah, some of them available in the National Museum, New Delhi, another Amaru-Sataka of the same period in the Prince of Wales Museum, Bombay and a Ragamala series of about 1650 A.D. in the Bharat Kala Bhavan, Banaras. 
    Deccan
    Though no pre-Mughal painting from the Deccan are so far known to exist, yet it can safely be presumed that sophisticated schools of painting flourished there, making a significant contribution to the development of the Mughal style in North India. Early centres of painting in the Deccan, during the 16th and 17th centuries were Ahmednagar, Bijapur and Golconda. In the Deccan, painting continued to develop independently of the Mughal style in the beginning. However, later in the 17th and 18th centuries it was increasingly influenced by the Mughal style.
    The plateau region in south india between the Narmada river and Krishna river is called deccan.This region continued the indigenous Hindu 
    tradition under the powerful rule of the Vijayanagar kings, while muslims dynastic were ruling the Northen part of india during 14th C.A.D Heritage of the painting style is rooted both in the deccan and south. Art of painting flourished also under the Bahmini ruler in the Deccan.Nagara, Bijapur all these painting style shared the stylistic features with paqinting traditions of western and Northen india.
    Jaunpur Schools of Painting- 
    A manuscript of Nimatnama painted at Mandu, during the period of Nasir Shah (1500–1510) represents a fusion of the aboriginal and Persian style, although it was the second which had dominance over the Mandu manuscripts. Another painting style was known as Lodi Khuladar which blossomed in the Sultanate period of North India. Sultanate territory stretched from Delhi to Jaunpur.

    Malwa, Deccan and Jaunpur schools of painting

    A new trend in manuscript illustration was set by a manuscript of the Nimatnama painted at Mandu, during the reign of Nasir Shah. This represent a synthesis of the indigenous and the Persian style, though it was the latter which dominated the Mandu manuscripts. There was another style of painting known as Lodi Khuladar that flourished in the Sultanate's dominion of North India extending from Delhi to Jaunpur.

    Malwa  

    Malwa  paintings show a fondness for rigorously flat compositions, black and chocolate-brown backgrounds, figures shown against a solid colour patch, and architecture painted in lively colour. The school’s most appealing features are a primitive charm and a simple childlike vision.

    Some of the important paintings executed in the Malwa style are a series of the Rasikapriya dated 1634 A.D., a series of the Amaru Sataka painted in 1652 A.D. at a place called Nasratgarh and a series of the Ragamala painted in 1680 A.D. by an artist named Madhau Das, at Narsyanga Shah, some of them available in the National Museum, New Delhi, another Amaru-Sataka of the same period in the Prince of Wales Museum, Bombay and a Ragamala series of about 1650 A.D. in the Bharat Kala Bhavan, Banaras. 

    Deccan

    Though no pre-Mughal painting from the Deccan are so far known to exist, yet it can safely be presumed that sophisticated schools of painting flourished there, making a significant contribution to the development of the Mughal style in North India. Early centres of painting in the Deccan, during the 16th and 17th centuries were Ahmednagar, Bijapur and Golconda. In the Deccan, painting continued to develop independently of the Mughal style in the beginning. However, later in the 17th and 18th centuries it was increasingly influenced by the Mughal style.

    The plateau region in south india between the Narmada river and Krishna river is called deccan.This region continued the indigenous Hindu 

    tradition under the powerful rule of the Vijayanagar kings, while muslims dynastic were ruling the Northen part of india during 14th C.A.D Heritage of the painting style is rooted both in the deccan and south. Art of painting flourished also under the Bahmini ruler in the Deccan.Nagara, Bijapur all these painting style shared the stylistic features with paqinting traditions of western and Northen india.

    Jaunpur Schools of Painting

    A manuscript of Nimatnama painted at Mandu, during the period of Nasir Shah (1500–1510) represents a fusion of the aboriginal and Persian style, although it was the second which had dominance over the Mandu manuscripts. Another painting style was known as Lodi Khuladar which blossomed in the Sultanate period of North India. Sultanate territory stretched from Delhi to Jaunpur.

     

     

     

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