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Means of Electrical Energy Production in India

India is presently one of the least energy efficient countries in the world. We have to adopt a cautious approach for the judicious use of our limited energy resources. For example, as concerned citizens we can do our bit by using public transport systems instead of individual vehicles; switching off electricity when not in use, using power-saving devices and using non-conventional sources of energy. After all, “energy saved is energy produced”. Electricity has such a wide range of applications in today’s world.
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India is presently one of the least energy efficient countries in the world. We have to adopt a cautious approach for the judicious use of our limited energy resources. For example, as concerned citizens we can do our bit by using public transport systems instead of individual vehicles; switching off electricity when not in use, using power-saving devices and using non-conventional sources of energy. After all, “energy saved is energy produced”. Electricity has such a wide range of applications in today’s world that, its per capita consumption is considered as an index of development.

There are three major means of electrical energy production in India- thermal energy, hydro-electrical energy and atomic energy which are discussed below:

Hydro electricity is generated by fast flowing water, which is a renewable resource. India has a number of multi-purpose projects like the Bhakra Nangal, Damodar Valley Corporation, the Kopili Hydel Project etc. producing hydroelectric power.

Thermal electricity is generated by using coal, petroleum and natural gas. The thermal power stations use non-renewable fossil fuels for generating electricity. There are over 310 thermal power plants in India.

Nuclear or Atomic Energy is obtained by altering the structure of atoms. When such an alteration is made, much energy is released in the form of heat and this is used to generate electric power. Uranium and thorium, which are available in Jharkhand and the Aravalli ranges of Rajasthan are used for generating atomic or nuclear power. The Monazite sands of Kerala are also rich in thorium.

Total Installed Capacity of Electricity in India

Sector

Percentage

State Sector

47.49 %

Central Sector

31.34 %

Private Sector

21.17 %

Fuel

Percentage

Thermal

64.98 %

Coal

10.20 %

Gas (Mainly Natural Gas)

0.69 %

Hydro (Renewable)

21.64%

Nuclear

2.75 %

Renewable Energy Sources (RES)

10.63