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IAS Prelims Exam: Modern History NCERT Questions: COLONIAL CITIES

For the aspirants of IAS Prelims Exam, following Multiple Choice Questions of Modern Indian History would help students in understanding the nature of questions asked in IAS Prelims Exam.

Feb 18, 2016 19:11 IST
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Questions asked from Modern Indian History section in IAS Prelims Exam are quite easy but the candidates need to memorise well before appearing in the exam. The candidates should have balanced preparation of overall three sections of the History and its chronology is one of the most important parts of the subject history which enable candidates to memorise well every important aspects of history.
Following Multiple Choice Questions of Modern Indian History would help students in understanding the nature of questions asked in IAS Prelims Exam.

Q1. Consider the following statements regarding the Colonial cities of India:
I. The three big colonial cities Madras (Chennai), Calcutta (Kolkata) and Bangalore, all three were originally fishing and weaving villages.
II. They became important centres of trade due to the economic activities of the English East India Company.
III. Company agents settled in Madras in 1639 and in Calcutta in 1690.
Which of the following statement(s) is/are correct?
A. Only I
B. I and II
C. II and III
D. All of the above

Answer: C

Explanation:
The three big colonial cities Madras (Chennai), Calcutta (Kolkata) and Bombay (Mumbai), all three were originally fishing and weaving villages. Bombay was given to the Company in 1661 by the English king, who had got it as part of his wife’s dowry from the king of Portugal. The Company established trading and administrative offices in each of these settlements.

Q2. Consider the following statements regarding the pre-colonial cities:
I. Towns were often defined in opposition to rural areas.
II. They came to represent specific forms of economic activities and cultures.
III. Towns by contrast were peopled with artisans, traders, administrators and rulers.

Which of the following statement(s) is/are correct?
A. Only I
B. I and II
C. II and III
D. All of the above

Answer: D

Explanation:
Towns were often defined in opposition to rural areas. They came to represent specific forms of economic activities and cultures. In the countryside people subsisted by cultivating land, foraging in the forest, or rearing animals. Towns by contrast were peopled with artisans, traders, administrators and rulers. Towns dominated over the rural population, thriving on the surplus and taxes derived from agriculture.

Q3. Consider the following statements regarding the towns of sixteenth and seventieth century built by Mughals:
I. Such towns were famous for their concentration of populations, their monumental buildings and their imperial grandeur and wealth.
II. Agra, Delhi and Lahore were important centres of imperial administration and control.
III. Mansabdars and jagirdars who were assigned territories in different parts of the empire usually maintained houses in these cities: residence in these centres of power was symbolic of the status and prestige of a noble.

Which of the following statement(s) is/are correct?
A. Only I
B. I and II
C. II and III
D. All of the above

Answer: D

Explanation:
During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries the towns built by the Mughals were famous for their concentration of populations, their monumental buildings and their imperial grandeur and wealth. Agra, Delhi and Lahore were important centres of imperial administration and control. Mansabdars and jagirdars who were assigned territories in different parts of the empire usually maintained houses in these cities: residence in these centres of power was symbolic of the status and prestige of a noble.

Q4. When was the Delhi became a capital of British India?
A. 1905
B. 1906
C. 1912
D. 1914

Answer: C

Explanation:
In the year 1912, the capital of British India had shifted from Calcutta to Delhi.

Q5. Consider the following statements regarding the changes occurred in pre-colonial cities in the eighteenth century:
I. All this started changing in the eighteenth century. With political and commercial realignments, old towns went into decline and new towns developed.
II. The gradual erosion of Mughal power led to the demise of towns associated with their rule and the Mughal capitals, Delhi and Agra, lost their political authority.
III. The growth of new regional powers was reflected in the increasing importance of regional capitals – Lucknow, Hyderabad, Seringapatam, Poona (present-day Pune), Nagpur, Baroda (presentday Vadodara) and Tanjore (present-day Thanjavur).

Which of the following statement(s) is/are correct?
A. Only I
B. I and II
C. II and III
D. All of the above

Answer: D

Explanation:
Traders, administrators, artisans and others migrated from the old Mughal centres to these new capitals in search of work and patronage. Continuous warfare between the new kingdoms meant that mercenaries too found ready employment there. Some local notables and officials associated with Mughal rule in North India also used this opportunity to create new urban settlements such as the qasbah and ganj.

Q6. Who was/were the architect(s) of Delhi?
A. Sir Herbert Baker
B. Sir Edwin Lutyens
C. Sobha Singh
D. Both A & B

Answer: D

Explanation:
The two british architects Sir Herbert Baker and Sir Edwin Lutyens had executed the planning and architect of Delhi the contract of building the city was bestowed on Sobha Singh.

Q7. In which of the following year the Delhi College was established?
A. 1782
B. 1792
C. 1795
D. 1799

Answer: B

Explanation:
The Delhi college was established in the year, 1792, which is presently known as a Zakir Husain Delhi College. It was initially founded as the Madrasa.

Q8. Which of the following period considered as the Delhi renaissance?
A. 1800 - 1830
B. 1830 - 1857
C. 1857 - 1880
D. 1880 - 1900

Answer: B

Explanation:
The period of 1830 - 1857 considered as the Delhi renaissance because during this period Delhi had grown intellectually in respect of science and humanities, largely in the Urdu language.

Q9. Which of the following institutions is first in India to initiate instruction in modern science through the local language?
A. Nalanda University
B. VikramShila University
C. Delhi College
D. Jawaharlal Nehru University

Answer: C

Explanation:
At the Delhi College the subjects were taught in Urdu even the modern science. At that time Delhi College was only of its kind which was later vandalised by the rebels of 1857.

Q10. Who had planned the Lahore Gate Improvement Scheme?
A. Lord Hardinge
B. Lord Irwin
C. Herbert Baker
D. Robert Clarke

Answer: D

Explanation:
The Lahore Gate Improvement Scheme was planned by Robert Clarke in the year 1888 for the Walled City residents.

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