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Reading Comprehension for IBPS PO, SBI SO, IPPB Exam 2016: Is this the final innings?

Oct 18, 2016 14:16 IST

    In the recent years, the English section in any banking examination consists of passages taken from leading dailies in English such as The Times of India, The Indian Express, The Hindu, The Economic Times, The Business Standard etc. You must be prepared for that and that is why, the banking team of Jagranjosh.com, the best portal for banking preparation, is bringing to you passages from these papers and questions on those in the recent pattern so that guide you in your preparation. This is a passage from ‘The Hindu’ (dated October 14, 2016) for Reading Comprehension questions. Go through it to give your preparation a boost.

    Question (1-10): Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow. Some words / phrases are printed in bold in the passage in order to help you locate them while answering some of the questions asked

    Three months removed from the historic Supreme Court of India verdict on the governance of cricket and the future of the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI), things will likely come to a contentious conclusion on October 17. In what is expected to be a conclusive order, the court will likely opine on the binding nature of the Justice R.M. Lodha committee’s directives on the BCCI, and set into motion a transition in cricket administration that is unprecedented in the sports ecosystem, not just in India but anywhere in the world.

    The origins of this dispute trace back to 2013, when spot-fixing, illegal betting, and eventually conflict of interest events were unearthed in the Indian Premier League, leading to a systematic investigation, inquiry, and eventually an order by the Supreme court. Building on the findings of the Supreme Court-appointed Justice Mukul Mudgal committee on the unsavoury aspects of cricket administration, the Justice Lodha committee in its report to the Supreme Court recommended the complete overhaul of cricket, in the interest of preserving India’s favourite pastime for the Indian cricket fan. The Justice Lodha committee recommendations, altering the BCCI’s fundamental structure along with a cleansing of the State cricket associations, were resisted by the Board and State associations. The Supreme Court accepted a majority of the committee’s recommendations in its landmark verdict on July 18, 2016. The court appointed the Justice Lodha committee to enforce the directives, transitioning the committee from an advisory and investigative capacity to an enforcement and implementation role.

    The committee set its first major deadline for implementation of its directives for September 30. The BCCI, however, sought respite from many of the directives, and enlisted the help of retired Supreme Court Justice Markandey Katju to assess and advise on the Supreme Court verdict. In his report to the BCCI, Justice Katju recommended that it file a review petition before a full bench of the Supreme Court, and further suggested that the committee and the court had acted in a manner that implied judicial overreach. The Board submitted a review petition, but due to some error in the submission, it is not being processed.

    Meanwhile, the Lodha committee continued to communicate with the authorised BCCI officials, with mixed results. Losing patience with the perceived lack of communication and intent by the BCCI, the committee clamped down on the implementation requirements, and in early September, it stepped up the offensive. The tipping point came when the BCCI conducted its Annual General Meeting on September 21. Having been given permission by the committee to conduct its AGM on normal matters not extending to major decisions for 2016-17, the BCCI went ahead with major decisions including one most irksome to the committee, announcing five selectors, some with no Test match experience, for the national teams in violation of the norms given by the committee.

    Even more concerning to the committee, there seemed to be no real intent by the BCCI to meet the deadline. In fact, puzzlingly, the Board set a date of September 30 for a Special General Body Meeting to discuss the Lodha committee’s recommendations. The committee therefore submitted a status report before the Supreme Court on September 28, which detailed what all had transpired from the July 18 verdict till date, and it recommended a radical overhaul, including the removal of top BCCI officials to be replaced by an administrative committee to oversee the Board. The court admonished the Board, and set October 6 for the next hearing, by which the Board was required to respond to the committee’s status report.

    The situation escalated quickly thereafter. After postponing the SGM to October 1 due to a technicality, the Board accepted only some of the committee’s recommendations, rejecting the remaining ones including the age and tenure restrictions as well as the ‘one State, one vote’ requirement for State associations. Now the committee took things a step further. On October 4, the committee sent a notice to two banks where the BCCI had accounts, directing them to freeze certain transactions made to State associations. The banks interpreted this to mean a complete freeze on the accounts, and informed the BCCI accordingly. The Board took this public, announcing that the clampdown meant that the ongoing series between India and New Zealand might need to be cancelled, a charge that the Lodha committee immediately refuted, clarifying that cricket matters were part of usual business and exempt.

    On October 6, the court reprimanded the BCCI for not accepting all the recommendations, and demanded an undertaking from the Board by October 7 stating that it would accept all the recommendations, which the Board did not provide. The court passed an interim order granting the BCCI until October 17 to provide the undertaking. It further put a freeze on the disbursement or use of funds to those State associations which had not implemented the committee’s recommendations in total. It also, in a potentially problematic situation for the BCCI president, demanded a personal affidavit setting out the nature of his communication with the International Cricket Council regarding the committee’s recommendations. The background to the affidavit requirement was an alleged request by the BCCI to ask the ICC to write to it about there being governmental interference as a violation of the ICC’s regulations which could lead to BCCI’s de-recognition. Should there be any gap between such an affidavit and any other substantive account of what actually happened, there is a risk of the BCCI president perjuring himself. Interestingly, the BCCI had earlier said that the committee’s recommendation of having a CAG representative on the apex committee and the IPL governing council would be considered government interference, but in the October 1 SGM, had accepted the recommendation.

    This has every appearance of being a conflict that isn’t likely to be resolved any time soon. And while the court appears to have the intent to enforce the committee’s recommendations, the BCCI might seek other options, including perhaps the support of a sports legislation that could address overlapping issues and be less restrictive. We know for certain that cricket in India has changed for good. What we don’t know is if it has changed for the better.

    1. Which among the following best explains the reason of Supreme Court of India getting into the regulation of BCCI in India?

    1. The SC had to step in because BCCI had no office bearer to run the cricket administration in the country
    2. The SC had to come to the rescue of BCCI because the board was not being managed properly on the financial front
    3. The SC had to step in so that the investigation into the spot fixing scandal in IPL does not go awry and all the culprits are brought to book
    4. The SC had to step in because there was a PIL in the apex court regarding the wrongdoings taking place in the organization
    5. Other than those given in options

    Solution: Option (3)

    Explanation: The SC involvement in BCCI goes way back to 2013 when the spot fixing scandal in the IPL came to light and there was a requirement to investigate the same properly and the mismanagement of the premier league is addressed properly along with the mismanagement in BCCI. This makes option (3) the right choice among the given options.

    2. Why is October 17 going to be a defining moment in the history of Indian cricket and for that matter, in the history of cricket administration around the world?

    1. BCCI is going to be given the statutory status on October 17 by the Supreme Court of India through a special verdict
    2. SC is going to decide whether the changes suggested by the RM Lodha committee can be made binding in nature on the board
    3. SC is going to take a stand regarding the total number of cricket associations that can function in the country
    4. SC is interested in settling the cause of conflict of interest in the cricket administration of the country
    5. Other than those given in options

    Solution: Option (2)

    Explanation: According to the information given in the passage, October 17 is going to be the judgment day for the board because on that day, the Supreme Court will decide whether the reforms suggested by the court appointed RM Lodha committee can be made binding on the BCCI. This is represented in option (2) and that is why, it is the right choice among the given options.

    3. Which among the following best explains the reason of the BCCI refusing the reforms suggested by the Lodha committee?

    1. The Lodha Committee on reforms of cricket in India is not the best committee the country has ever had
    2. The committee has suggested that BCCI should be replaced with only state cricket associations because others are not at all functional
    3. The committee suggested that there should be fundamental change in the constitution of BCCI and that affects the state associations as well
    4. BCCI is of the view that the committee is trying to undermine the interests of the smaller cricket associations in the country
    5. Other than those given in options

    Solution: Option (3)

    Explanation: According to the information given in the passage, Lodha committee has suggested reforms that are going to change the fundamental nature of the constitution of BCCI and that is why, BCCI is opposing the reforms tooth and nail along with its member state associations which are also going to pay for the reforms. This makes option (3) the right choice among the given options.

    4. Which among the following best explains the response given by BCCI regarding the reforms suggested by the Supreme Court appointed Lodha committee?

    1. The BCCI appointed another committee headed by a former Supreme Court judge in order to give fitting reply to the court
    2. The BCCI has implemented almost all the reforms suggested by the Lodha committee
    3. The BCCI is in mood to relent to the suggestions made by the committee and that is why, it has approached the cabinet
    4. The BCCI is going to file a contempt claim in the apex court regarding the implementation of reforms in the cricket administration of the country
    5. Other than those given in options

    Solution: Option (1)

    Explanation: According to the information given in the passage, BCCI appointed the Katju panel so that it can draft fitting replies to the recommendations made by Lodha committee as the board feels that implementing all the reforms may harm the interest of cricket in the country and that is why, it has defied the first deadline set by the committee to implement the reforms without much results. This makes option (1) the right choice among the given options.

    5. Which among the following is a step already taken by the Lodha committee in order to stop the BCCI from functioning unless the recommendations are implemented by the board?

    1. BCCI decided to challenge the changes recommended by the committee and the committee has already announced the board as unconstitutional
    2. BCCI is not in a position to decide anything and that is why Lodha committee is giving it as much time as possible
    3. BCCI has been asked not to distribute any money to the state associations unless all the changes are implemented
    4. BCCI has been asked to hold a special general meeting so that all the concerns are addressed properly
    5. Other than those given in options

    Solution: Option (3)

    Explanation: Despite repeated reminders and deadlines set by the Lodha committee, BCCI has not paid heed to the recommendations made by the committee and decided to implemented the reforms partly only. In this light, BCCI has decided to hold the general meeting though it was not prescribed by the committee. However, the committee has asked the board to hold all the funds to be distributed to the state associations until the recommendations are implemented in letter and spirit. This makes option (3) the right choice among the given options.

    6. Which among the following is an example of the violation made by BCCI regarding the recommended changes suggested by the Lodha committee?

    1. BCCI held a general meeting though it was asked to hold a special meeting
    2. BCCI appointed the coach of various state cricket teams without consulting the famous players from the respective states
    3. BCCI appointed selectors for selection of cricket team and the selectors lacked necessary experience
    4. BCCI has not communicated with the Lodha committee members regarding the change of guard taking place in the organization
    5. Other than those given in options

    Solution: Option (3)

    Explanation: According to the passage, Lodha committee tried to communicate with the BCCI members on many occasions though they were not paid attention to at all. Despite being asked to appoint selectors for cricket teams with experience of playing first class cricket or international cricket, the board ignored this and appointed selectors without any necessary experience. This makes option (3) the right choice among the given options.

    7. Which among the following is similar in meaning to the word ‘implied’ as used in the passage?

    1. Intimated
    2. Arrested
    3. Exhausted
    4. Subsumed
    5. Suggested

    Solution: Option (5)

    Explanation: According to the given context, the word means that the Katju committee appointed by BCCI to study the recommendations made by the Lodha committee opined that the SC had gone too much and its approach suggested judicial overreach on its part. This makes option (5) the right choice among the given options.

    8. Which among the following is similar in meaning to the word ‘intent’ as used in the passage?

    1. Ambition
    2. Ascension
    3. Execution
    4. Expression
    5. Intention

    Solution: Option (5)

    Explanation: According to the given context, it means that BCCI has no real intention to implement the reforms suggested by the Lodha committee for carrying out reforms in Indian cricket. This makes option (5) the right choice among the given options.

    9. Which among the following is opposite in meaning to the word ‘admonished’ as used in the passage?

    1. Excused
    2. Executed
    3. Persecuted
    4. Persisted
    5. Appreciated

    Solution: Option (5)

    Explanation: According to the given context, it means that the SC was harsh against the BCCI because they did not implement the recommendations made by the Lodha committee which was appointed by the apex court to oversee the implementation of all the reforms suggested earlier by Mukul Mudgal Committee in this regard. This makes option (5) the right choice among the given options as it means praising somebody for something.

    10. Which among the following is opposite in meaning to the word ‘violation’ as used in the passage?

    1. Ostracized
    2. Oscillation
    3. Astute
    4. Obedience
    5. Other than those given in options

    Solution: Option (4)

    Explanation: According to the given context, it means that the BCCI has not paid heed to the recommendations made by the Lodha committee regarding implantation of reforms in Indian cricket. This makes option (4) the right choice as the opposite since it means going by the rules and regulations.

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