Iran responds to US sanctions by voting to boost military defence

Aug 14, 2017 09:55 IST
Iran votes to boost military defence

Iran's parliament on 13 August 2017 voted in favour of boosting investment in its missile defence and foreign operations programmes by more than $500 million.

The bill was passed with an overwhelming majority. Among 244 parliamentarians present, 240 voted in favour of passing the bill. The move is in response to the latest round of sanctions imposed on Iran by the United States of America.

The US had imposed sanctions on the country after it conducted ballistic missile test in January 2017.

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According to Iran, the sanctions violate the 2015 nuclear deal, which has been referred to as the worst ever by US President Donald Trump, who has also threatened to tear it up.

The Iranian legislation must pass a second vote before submission for final approval. Iranian MPs were reported to have shouted "death to America" after Speaker Ali Larijani announced the voting results.

The new 27-point bill proposes that the Iranian government should allocate an additional sum of $260 million each for the development of the missile programme and for Iran's Quds Force, a branch of the country's Revolutionary Guards Corps.

Besides this, the bill will also impose sanctions on US military and intelligence officials in the region.

According to Iran's chief nuclear negotiator, Abbas Araqchi, the new bill is not in violation of the 2015 agreement limiting the country's nuclear programme.

2015 Nuclear Deal

• The nuclear deal was a preliminary framework agreement reached in 2015 between Iran and major world powers.

• The world powers included all the permanent members of the United Nations Security Council- the United States, the United Kingdom, Russia, France and China- plus Germany and the European Union.

• The framework of the deal was reached on in April 2015 in Switzerland, which was agreed upon by all the concerned powers including Iran.

• According to the framework, Iran would redesign, convert, and reduce its nuclear facilities and accept the Additional Protocol (with provisional application) in order to lift all nuclear-related economical sanctions, freeing up tens of billions of dollars in oil revenue and frozen assets.

• The agreement saw the lifting of crippling economic sanctions on Iran in return for the country restricting its sensitive nuclear activities.

• The nuclear deal was largely seen as the best way to prevent Iran from getting a nuclear weapon.


Iran responds to US sanctions by voting to boost military defence

Iran’s Parliament voted to boost military defence by $500m

Tags: Iran, 2015 Nuclear Deal, Military Agreement, US Sanctions, Nuclear Weapon, Missile Defence Operation

Iran's parliament has voted in favour of boosting investment in its missile defence and foreign operations programmes by more than $500 million, in response latest US sanctions.

The bill was passed with an overwhelming majority. Among 244 parliamentarians present, 240 voted in favour of passing the bill.

 

Iran's parliament on 13 August 2017 voted in favour of boosting investment in its missile defence and foreign operations programmes by more than $500 million.

The bill was passed with an overwhelming majority. Among 244 parliamentarians present, 240 voted in favour of passing the bill. The move is in response to the latest round of sanctions imposed on Iran by the United States of America.

The US had imposed sanctions on the country after it conducted ballistic missile test in January 2017.

According to Iran, the sanctions violate the 2015 nuclear deal, which has been referred to as the worst ever by US President Donald Trump, who has also threatened to tear it up.

The Iranian legislation must pass a second vote before submission for final approval. Iranian MPs were reported to have shouted "death to America" after Speaker Ali Larijani announced the voting results.

The new 27-point bill proposes that the Iranian government should allocate an additional sum of $260 million each for the development of the missile programme and for Iran's Quds Force, a branch of the country's Revolutionary Guards Corps. 

Besides this, the bill will also impose sanctions on US military and intelligence officials in the region.

According to Iran's chief nuclear negotiator, Abbas Araqchi, the new bill was not in violation of the 2015 agreement limiting the country's nuclear programme.

2015 Nuclear Deal

·         The nuclear deal was a preliminary framework agreement reached in 2015 between Iran and six world powers.

·         The world powers include all the permanent members of the UN Security Council, namely, the United States, the United Kingdom, Russia, France and China- plus Germany and the European Union.

·         The framework of the deal was reached on in April 2015 in Switzerland, which was agreed upon by all the concerned powers including Iran.

·         According to the framework, Iran would redesign, convert, and reduce its nuclear facilities and accept the Additional Protocol (with provisional application) in order to lift all nuclear-related economical sanctions, freeing up tens of billions of dollars in oil revenue and frozen assets.

·         The agreement saw the lifting of crippling economic sanctions on Iran in return for the country restricting its sensitive nuclear activities.

·         The nuclear deal was largely seen as the best way to prevent Iran from getting a nuclear weapon.

 

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