Jagran Josh Logo
  1. Home
  2.  |  
  3. Environment | Ecology |  

Recent Slump in Global Warming Would Lead to Lower Rise in Temperatures: Research

May 20, 2013 16:55 IST

Researchers in the month of May 2013 found that recent slump in global warming would lead to lower rise in temperatures in short-term. Since the year 1998, there has remained unexplained stagnation in heating of the atmosphere of Earth. The researchers explained that this will bring down the rate of predicted global warming in coming decades.

 However, in the long term, the expected rise in the temperatures will not change much. Slowdown in expected global warming rate has remained a subject of study for quite some time now. Earlier in 2013, the UK Met Office also brought down the five-year temperature forecast.

The new research depicts a clear picture of how a slowdown can affect the temperatures in short term and long term. A collective team of international researchers studied how previous 10 years would affect long term balance of the climate sensitivity as well as short term climate response.
 
Climate sensitivity studies the impact of doubled concentrations of carbon dioxide in atmosphere. On the other hand, climate response is the short term calculation that is also based on doubled carbon dioxide.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in the year 2007 observed that short term rise in temperature would be around 1-3C (1.8-5.4F). But in the new analysis, the estimated range would be 0.9-2.0C.

The authors of the story found out that over a period of a few coming decades, the global average temperatures of Earth would warm by around 20 percent slower than forecasted. However, when the long term picture is kept in mind, the work remains consistent with the previous forecasts. IPCC revealed that climate sensitivity remained at the range of 2.0-4.5C.

The researchers explained that difference between lower short-term estimates as well as consistent long-term picture remains on the fact that heat from previous 10 years was absorbed into and stored in oceans of the world.

Is this article important for exams ? Yes18 People Agreed
Read more Current Affairs on: Global Warming , Rise in Temperatures

DISCLAIMER: JPL and its affiliates shall have no liability for any views, thoughts and comments expressed on this article.

Latest Videos

Register to get FREE updates

    All Fields Mandatory
  • (Ex:9123456789)
  • Please Select Your Interest
  • Please specify

  • ajax-loader
  • A verifcation code has been sent to
    your mobile number

    Please enter the verification code below

Newsletter Signup
Follow us on
This website uses cookie or similar technologies, to enhance your browsing experience and provide personalised recommendations. By continuing to use our website, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Cookie Policy. OK