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IAS Prelims Exam: Medieval History NCERT Questions: India in the First Half of the 17th Century II

May 31, 2016 16:35 IST

    Old NCERT Books are still high in demand in terms of UPSC IAS Exam Preparation because it has extensive coverage of the topics given in the UPSC IAS Exam syllabus. The IAS aspirants find it difficult to get an old edition NCERT book from market due to its unavailability in the market.

    Here, we have provided Multiple Choice Questions of Medieval Indian History which have been created from the old edition of NCERT book, go and check your level of your Preparation of IAS Prelims Exam.

    1.Amu Darya was a

    a.River of the Ancient period

    b.A pond during Mughal time

    c.A canal established by Aurangzeb

    d.None of the above

    Answer: a

    Explanation:

    Amu Darya also called as the Amu River and historically known by its Latin name, Oxus, is a major river in Central Asian region. It is formed by the junction of the Vakhsh and Panj rivers, at Qaleh-ye Panjeh in Afghanistan, and flows from there north-westwards into what remains of the Aral Sea. In ancient times, the river was regarded as the boundary between Greater Iran and Turan.

    2.Consider the following statements regarding the campaign of Mughal rulers for Balkh and Badakhshan:
    I.The areas of Balkh and Badakhshan bordered Kabul, and which had been ruled over by Timurid princes till 1585.

    II.The campaign was a success in the military sense—the Mughals conquered Balkh, and defeated Uzbek attempts to oust them.

    III.This was the first significant victory of Indian arms in the region, and Shah Jahan had reason to celebrate it.

    Which of the following statement(s) is/are correct?

    a.Only I

    b.I and II

    c.I and III

    d.All of the above

    Answer: d

    Explanation:

    Shah Jahan’s objective was to secure a friendly ruler in Balkh and Badakhshan, the areas which bordered Kabul, and which had been ruled over by Timurid princes till 1585. This, he believed, would also help in controlling the disaffection of the Afghan tribes living around Ghazni and in the Khyber Pass. The campaign was a success in the military sense—the Mughals conquered Balkh, and defeated Uzbek attempts to oust them. This was the first significant victory of Indian arms in the region, and Shah Jahan had reason to celebrate it.

    3.Consider the following statements regarding the failure of Mughals at Quandhar during the reign of Aurangzeb:
    I.The failure of Mughals at Quandhar did not so much reflect the weakness of Mughal artillery, as has been asserted by some historians.

    II.The failure of Mughals at Quandhar rather showed the inherent strength of Qandhar fort if held by a determined commander, and the ineffectiveness of medieval artillery against strong forts.

    III.It was not so much the loss of Qandhar as the failure of the repeated Mughal efforts which affected the Mughal prestige.

    Which of the following statement(s) is/are correct?

    a.Only I

    b.I and II

    c.I and III

    d.All of the above

    Answer: d

    Explanation:

    The failure of Mughals at Quandhar did not so much reflect the weakness of Mughal artillery, as has been asserted by some historians. It rather showed the inherent strength of Qandhar fort if held by a determined commander, and the ineffectiveness of medieval artillery against strong forts. (This was also the Mughal experience in the Deccan). It may, however, be argued that Shah Jahan’s attachment to Qandhar was more sentimental than realistic. With the growing enfeeblement of both the Uzbeks and the Safavids, Qandhar no longer had the same strategic importance as it had earlier. It was not so much the loss of Qandhar as the failure of the repeated Mughal efforts which affected the Mughal prestige. But even this should not be unduly exaggerated for the Mughal Empire remained outwardly at the height of its power and prestige during Aurangzeb's reign.

    4.Consider the following statements regarding the Mughals attempt of maintaining its frontiers and various policies:

    I.Mughals succeeded in maintaining a scientific frontier in the northwest, based on the Nindukush, on the one side, and the Kabul-Gazni line, on the other, with Qandhar as its outer bastion.

    II.Mughal’s basic foreign policy was based on the defence of India.

    III.The military and diplomatic means adopted by the Mughals were remarkably successful in giving India security from foreign invasions for a long time.

    Which of the following statement(s) is/are correct?

    a.Only I

    b.I and II

    c.I and III

    d.All of the above

    Answer: d

    Explanation:

    Mughals succeeded in maintaining a scientific frontier in the northwest, based on the Hindukush, on the one side, and the Kabul-Gazni line, on the other, with Qandhar as its outer bastion. Thus, their basic foreign policy was based on the defence of India. The defence of this frontier-line was further buttressed by diplomatic means. Friendship with Persia was its keynote, despite temporary setbacks over the question of Qandhar. The oft-proclaimed desire of recovering the Mughal homelands was really used as a diplomatic ploy, for it was never seriously pursued. These military and diplomatic means adopted by the
    Mughals were remarkably successful in giving India security from foreign invasions for a long time.

    5.Consider the following statements regarding the foreign policy and trade of Mughals:

    I.The Mughals insisted on relations of equality with leading Asian nations of the time, both with the Safavids, who claimed a special position by virtue of their relationship with the Prophet, and with the Ottoman sultans.
    II.Mughals used their foreign policy to rule the various territories of the world.
    III.Kabul and Qandhar were the twin gateways of India's trade with Central Asia.

    Which of the following statement(s) is/are correct?

    a.Only I

    b.I and II

    c.I and III

    d.All of the above

    Answer: c

    Explanation:

    The Mughals insisted on relations of equality with leading Asian nations of the time, both with the Safavids, who claimed a special position by virtue of their relationship with the Prophet, and with the Ottoman sultans who had assumed the title of Padshah-i-Islam and claimed to be the successors of the Caliph of Baghdad. Thirdly, the Mughals used their foreign policy to promote India's commercial interests. Kabul and Qandhar were the twin gateways of India's trade with Central Asia. The economic importance of this trade for the Mughal Empire has yet to be fully assessed.

    6.Consider the following statements regarding Mughal Administrative machinery:

    I.The administrative machinery and revenue system developed by Akbar were maintained under Jahangir and Shah Jahan with minor modifications.

    II.Important changes were, however, effected in the functioning or the mansabdari system.

    III.The mansabdari system, as it developed under the Mughals, was a distinctive and unique system which did not have any exact parallel outside India.

    Which of the following statement(s) is/are correct?

    a.Only I

    b.I and II

    c.I and III

    d.All of the above

    Answer: d

    Explanation:

    The administrative machinery and revenue system developed by Akbar were maintained under Jahangir and Shah Jahan with minor modifications. Important changes were, however, effected in the functioning or the mansabdari system. The mansabdari system, as it developed under the Mughals, was a distinctive and unique system which did not have any exact parallel outside India.

    7.Consider the following statements regarding the Mansabdari system of Mughals:

    I.The origins of the mansabdari system can, perhaps be traced back to Changez Khan who organised his army on a decimal basis, the lowest unit of command being ten, and the highest ten thousand (roman) whose commander was called khan.

    II.The mansabdari system, as it developed under the Mughals, was a not a distinctive and unique system there was already exist such system exact parallel outside India.

    Which of the following statement(s) is/are correct?

    a.Only I

    b.Only II

    c.Both I and II

    d.Neither I nor II

    Answer: c

    Explanation:

    The origins of the mansabdari system can, perhaps be traced back to Changez Khan who organised his army on a decimal basis, the lowest unit of command being ten, and the highest ten thousand (roman) whose commander was called khan. The Mongol system influenced, to some extent, the military system of the Delhi Sultanate, for we hear of commanders of hundred and one thousands (sadis and hazaras).

    8.Mansabdars were:

    a.those who were holing ranks  below 500 zats

    b.those from 500 and below 2500 zats

    c.those holding ranks of 2500 and above zats

    d.those holding ranks after the ruler

    Answer: a

    Explanation:

    There were sixty-six grades or mansabs from ten to ten thousand. But ranks above five thousand were reserved for princes. Persons holding ranks below 500 zat were called mansabdars, those from 500 and below 2500 amirs, and those holding ranks of 2500 and above were called amir-i-umda or amir-i-azam. However, the word mansabdar is sometimes used for all the three categories.

    9.Consider the following statements regarding the appointment and termination of persons in mansabs:

    I.Persons were generally appointed at a low mansab and gradually promoted, depending upon their merits and the favour of the emperor

    II.A person could also be demoted as a mark of punishment.

    III.People entered service at the lowest rung of the ladder, and could hope to rise to the position of an amir or even amir-i-umda.

    Which of the following statement(s) is/are correct?

    a.Only I

    b.I and II

    c.I and III

    d.All of the above

    Answer: c

    Explanation:

    Persons were generally appointed at a low mansab and gradually promoted, depending upon their merits and the favour of the emperor. A person could also be demoted as a mark of punishment. Thus, there was only one service including both armymen and civilians. People entered service at the lowest rung of the ladder, and could hope to rise to the position of an amir or even amir-i-umda. To that extent, careers were thrown open to talent.

    10.The person who either controlled or collected revenue from number of villages during the Mughal period called:

    a.Sadi

    b.Hazara

    c.Toman

    d.All of the above

    Answer: d

    Explanation:

    The terms sadi, hazara, and toman quickly began to be used for persons who either controlled that number of villages or collected revenue of that account. The Mughal term Karori, i.e., a person who collected a kror of dame, was one such term.

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