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NCERT Solutions for Class 9 Economics - Chapter 1: The Story of Village Palampur

Get NCERT Solutions for Class 9 Economics - Chapter 1: The Story of Village Palampur and prepare for CBSE Class 9 Social Science exam 2020-21. 

May 22, 2020 19:00 IST
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NCERT Solutions for Class 9 Economics - Chapter 1: The Story of Village Palampur
NCERT Solutions for Class 9 Economics - Chapter 1: The Story of Village Palampur

Check NCERT Solution  for Class 9 Economics - Chapter 1: The Story of Village Palampur. These solutions are based on the latest edition of Class 9 Economics NCERT textbook 2020-21. If you don’t have latest edition of the book then you can download PDF from the link given below

NCERT Book for Class 9 Social Science: Download Chapter-wise PDF of History, Geography, Economics, Civics

NCERT Solutions for Class 9 Economics - Chapter 1: The Story of Village Palampur

1. Every village in India is surveyed once in ten years during the Census and some of details are presented in the following format. Fill up the following based on information on Palampur.

a. LOCATION:

b. TOTAL AREA OF THE VILLAGE:

c. LAND USE (in hectares):

Cultivated Land

Land not available for cultivation (Area covering dwellings, roads,

ponds, grazing ground)

Irrigated

Unirrigated

   

26 Hectares

d. FACILITIES:

Educational

 

Medical

 

Market

 

Electricity Supply

 

Communication

 

Nearest Town

 

Answer:

a. Location: Bulandshahr District (Uttar Pradesh West)

b. Total Area of the Village: 226 hectares

c. Land Use (in hectares):

Cultivated Land

Land not available for cultivation (Area covering dwellings, roads,

ponds, grazing ground)

Irrigated

Unirrigated

200 hectares

-

26 Hectares

d. Facilities:

Educational

2 primary schools & 1 high school

Medical

1 state run primary health care centre, 1 private dispensary 

Market

2 Main Markets: Raiganj & Shahpur

Electricity Supply

Majority of houses have electricity connection and the electricity is being used to run small businesses and tubewells.

Communication

Connectivity with neighbouring villages is good, Raiganj is within 3 km. Conventional transportation including bullock carts, tongas, bogeys carrying jaggery.  Motor vehicles like tractors, motorcycles, jeep and trucks are also available for easy transportation.

Nearest Town

Shahpur

 

2. Modern farming methods require more inputs which are manufactured in industry. Do you agree?

Answer:

Yes, higher yield is possible only from a combination of HYV seeds, irrigation, chemical fertilisers, pesticides, tubewells for irrigation, and pesticides in farming besides farm machinery, like tractors and threshers, which is necessary for faster ploughing and harvesting faster. 

3. How did the spread of electricity help farmers in Palampur?

Answer: 

Electricity came early to Palampur. Its major impact was to transform the system of irrigation. Persian wheels were, till then, used by farmers to draw water from the wells and irrigate small fields. People saw that the electric-run tubewells could irrigate much larger areas of land more effectively. The first few tubewells were installed by the government. Soon, however, farmers started setting up private tubewells. As a result, by the mid-1970s the entire cultivated area of 200 hectares (ha.) was irrigated. To grow more than one crop on a piece of land during the year is known as multiple cropping. It is the most common way of increasing production on a given piece of land. All farmers in Palampur grow at least two main crops; many are growing potatoes as the third crop in the past fifteen to twenty years.

4. Is it important to increase the area under irrigation? Why?

Answer: 

Of the total cultivated area in the country a little less than 40 per cent is irrigated even today. In the remaining areas, farming is largely dependent on rainfall. In India, rainfall is not regular and irrigation is important to get better crop yield and hence it is important to increase the area under irrigation. 

5. Construct a table on the distribution of land among the 450 families of Palampur.

Answer: 

Number of Families

Area of cultivated land (hectares)

150

0

240

Less than 2 hectares

60

More than 2 hectares

 

6. Why are the wages for farm labourers in Palampur less than minimum wages?

Answer: 

Due to heavy competition for work among the farm labourers in Palampur, people often agree to work for lower wages. 

7. In your region, talk to two labourers. Choose either farm labourers or labourers working at construction sites. What wages do they get? Are they paid in cash or kind? Do they get work regularly? Are they in debt?

Answer:

Do it yourself. 

8. What are the different ways of increasing production on the same piece of land? Use examples to explain.

Answer: 

Multiple cropping and the use of modern farming methods are some of the ways to increase production on the same piece of land. 

In multiple cropping, different crops are grown in different seasons of a year. For example, jowar and bajra grow during the rainy season, followed by potatoes between October and December and during the winter season, wheat is sown in the fields. During the rainy season (kharif) farmers grow jowar and bajra. It is followed by the cultivation of potatoes between October and December. In the winter season (rabi), fields are sown with wheat. 

In modern farming, HYV seeds, chemical fertilizers, pesticides and proper irrigation is used to increase the yield.

9. Describe the work of a farmer with 1 hectare of land.

Answer: 

Generally, all the work is done by the farmer and his family members in the land. Major work involves ploughing, sowing of seeds, harvesting and taking the product to the market.

10. How do the medium and large farmers obtain capital for farming? How is it different from the small farmers?

Answer: 

Medium and large farmers easily get loans from banks as they have home and lands. Medium and large farmers often put surplus cash by selling their crops for next season. Small farmers have small sizes of plots and their production is not enough.The lack of surplus means that they are unable to obtain capital from their own savings, and have to borrow from local money lenders as they don’t get loans from banks, easily. 

11. On what terms did Savita get a loan from Tajpal Singh? Would Savita’s condition be different if she could get a loan from the bank at a low rate of interest?

Answer: 

Savita estimated that the working capital itself would cost a minimum of Rs 3,000. She doesn’t have the money, so she decides to borrow from Tejpal Singh, a large farmer. Tejpal Singh agrees to give Savita the loan at an interest rate of 24 per cent for four months, which is a very high-interest rate. Savita also had to promise to work on his field as a farm labourer during the harvest season at Rs 100 per day.

If she could get a loan from the bank at a low rate of interest then she can concentrate on her land instead of working as a labourer in Tejpal Singh’s farm at very low wage.

12. Talk to some old residents in your region and write a short report on the changes in irrigation and changes in production methods during the last 30 years. (Optional)

Answer: 

Do it yourself.

13. What are the non-farm production activities taking place in your region? Make a short list.

Answer: 

Some of the activities are:

- Construction

- Transportation

- Mining

- Fishing

- Dairy

14. What can be done so that more non-farm production activities can be started in villages?

Answer: 

Proper and training and suitable infrastructure must be provided to promote non-farm activities. The government should also provide capital via loans at low interest. Good connectivity between cities and villages and transport is also important to promote non-farm production activities.  

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