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Modern History Quiz for IAS Exam: Struggle for Swaraj 4

Feb 28, 2018 18:14 IST
    Modern History Quiz for IAS Exam: Struggle for Swaraj 4
    Modern History Quiz for IAS Exam: Struggle for Swaraj 4

    The UPSC IAS aspirants must study and practice well the static part of the UPSC IAS syllabus. An IAS aspirant should study the necessary books and study material for IAS Exam on a priority basis and then they should proceed to the next level of IAS preparation. It is very important to study the questions based on the pattern of IAS Prelims Exam which will provide an immense strength to the IAS aspirants in solving questions. Here we, have provided multiple choice questions based on the topic of Indian Modern History, struggle for Swaraj are very important for IAS Prelims Exam 2018.

    Modern History Quiz for IAS Exam: Struggle for Swaraj 3

    1. After which of the following incident, the Bardoli resolution was passed?
    a. Jallianwala Bagh massacre
    b. Chauri Chaura incident
    c. Death of Lala Lajpat Rai
    d. None of the above

    Answer: b

    Explanation:

    On February 4, 1922, a mob of 3000 peasants gathered to picket a liquor shop at Chauri Chaura, a town near Gorakhpur, Uttar Pradesh. The local administration sent armed police to control the situation. The Police tried to disperse the crowd by firing two shots in the air. So stone pelting started. The police fired and killed 3 people. The result was that outrageous mob set the Police Chauki on fire and all 23 Police wallas inside got burnt alive.

    On 12 February 1922, when the Congress leaders met at Bardoli, Gandhi decided to withdraw the Noncooperation movement. It was a bit controversial but by that time Gandhi’s figure was respected by every Congressman. Thus, they accepted this decision, but they got demoralized and disintegrated. Gandhi was arrested on 10 March 1922 and trialled at Ahmadabad. A simple prison of 6 years was awarded to him. The Bardoli resolution stunned the country and had a mixed reception among the nationalists while some had implicit faith in Gandhiji, others resented this decision to retreat.

    Modern History Quiz for IAS Exam: Struggle for Swaraj 2

    2. Consider the following statements regarding the contribution of Khilafat agitation:
    1. It had brought urban Muslims into the nationalist movement responsible in part for the feeling of nationalist enthusiasm and exhilaration that prevailed in the country in those days.
    2. It was inevitable that different sections of society would come to understand the need for freedom through their particular demands and experiences.
    3. The Khilafat agitation represented much wider feelings of the Muslims than their concern for the Caliph.

    Which of the above statements is/are correct?
    a. 1 only
    b. 1 and 2
    c. 2 and 3
    d. 1, 2 and 3

    Answer: d

    Explanation:

    The Khilafat agitation had made an important contribution to the non-cooperation movement. It had brought urban Muslims into the nationalist movement and had been, thus, responsible in part for the feeling of nationalist enthusiasm and exhilaration that prevailed in the country in those days. Some historians have criticised it for having mixed politics with religion. As a result, they say, religious consciousness spread to politics, end in the long run, the forces of communalism were strengthened. This is true to some extent. There was, of course, nothing wrong in the nationalist movement taking up a demand that affected Muslims only. It was inevitable that different sections of society would come to understand the need for freedom through their particular demands and experiences. The nationalist leadership, however, failed to some extent in raising the religious political consciousness of the Muslims to the higher plane of secular political consciousness. At the same time, it should also be kept in view that the Khilafat agitation represented much wider feelings of the Muslims than their concern for the Caliph. It was, in reality, an aspect of the general spread of anti-imperialist feelings among the Muslims. These feelings found concrete expression on the Khilafat question. After all, there was no protest in India when Kamal Pasha abolished the Caliphate in 1924.

    3. The Congress- Khilafat Swaraj Party was founded by:
    a. Jawaharlal Nehru
    b. Motilal Nehru
    c. Mahatma Gandhi
    d. Subhash Chandra Bose

    Answer: b

    Explanation:

    In December 1922, Das and Motilal Nehru formed the Congress-Khilafat Swaraj Party with Das as president and Motilal Nehru as one of the secretaries. The new party was to function as a group within the Congress. It accepted the Congress programme except in one respect— it would take part in Council elections.

    The Swarajists and the "no-changers” now engaged in fierce political controversy. Even Gandhiji, who had been released on 5 February 1924 on grounds of health, failed in his efforts to unite them. But on his advice, the two groups agreed to remain in the Congress thought they would work in their separate ways.

    IAS Prelims Exam Modern History Questions: Economic Impact of the British Rule 1

    4. Consider the following statements regarding the ideologies of "no-changers" in the modern history of India:
    1. The ‘No-changers’ opposed council entry.
    2. They advocated concentration on constructive work and continuation of boycott and noncooperation.
    3. This school of thought led by Vallabhbhai Patel, Rajendra Prasad, C. Rajagopalachari & M.A. Ansari came to be known as the ‘No-changers’.

    Which of the above statements is/are correct?
    a. 1 only
    b. 1 and 2
    c. 2 and 3
    d. 1, 2 and 3

    Answer: d

    Explanation:

    Disintegration and disorganisation set in after the withdrawal of the civil' disobedience movement. Enthusiasm evaporated and disillusionment and discouragement prevailed in the ranks of the Congress party. Moreover, a serious difference arose among the leaders.

    A fresh lead was now given by C.R-. Das and Martial Nehru who advocated a new line of political activity under the changed conditions. They said that nationalists should end the boycott of the Legislative Councils, enter them, obstruct their working according to official plans, expose their weaknesses, and thus use them to arouse public enthusiasm. Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel, Dr. Ansari, Babu Rajendra Prasad, and others, known as "no-changers", opposed Council-entry. They warned that legislative politics would weaken nationalist fervour and create rivalries among the leaders. They, therefore, continued to emphasise the constructive programme of spinning, temperance, Hindu-Muslim unity, and removal of untouchability.

    The Swarajists and the "no-changers” now engaged in fierce political controversy. Even Gandhiji, who had been released on 5 February 1924 on grounds of health, failed in his efforts to unite them. But on his advice, the two groups agreed to remain in the Congress thought they would work in their separate ways.

    Modern History Quiz: Economic Impact of the British Rule 2

    5. In December 1917, which of the following organisations was/were established?
    a. Hindu Mahasabha
    b. Muslim League
    c. Swaraj Party
    d. Both a and b

    Answer: d

    Explanation:

    As the non-cooperation movement petered out and the people felt frustrated, communalism reared its ugly head. The communal elements took advantage of the situation to propagate their views and after 1923 the country was repeatedly plunged into communal riots. The Muslim League and the Hindu Mahasabha, which was founded in December 1917, once again became active. The result was that the growing feeling that all people were Indians first received a set-back. Even the Swarajist Party, whose main leaders, Motilal Nehru and Das, were staunch nationalists, was split by communalism, A group known as “responsivists", including Madan Mohan Malviya, Lala Lajpat Rai, and N.C, Kelkar, offered cooperation to the Government so that the so-called Hindu interests might be safeguarded. They accused Motilal Nehru of letting down Hindus, of being anti-Hindu, of favouring cow-slaughter, and of eating beef. The Muslim communalists were no less active in fighting for the loaves and fishes or office. G&ndhiji, who had repeatedly asserted that “Hindu-Muslim unity must be our creed for all time and under all circumstances” tried to intervene and improve the situation.

    History Questions for IAS

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