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Jharkhand: Festivals

12-NOV-2013 14:57

    Sarhul

    Sarhul is distinguished during the spring season and Saal trees obtain new flowers on their branches. It is a reverence of the village god who is regarded to be the guardian of the clan. People dance and sing when the fresh flowers come out. The Gods are worshiped with the Saal flowers. The Pahan or priest of village fasts for some days. In dawn, the priests take bath and puts on dhoti made of kachha dhaga (virgin cotton). The preceding dusk, the priests take 3 new earthen pots and fill them with water; the subsequent morning they observe these earthen pots and water level within. If the level of water decreases they predict that there would be less rain or famine and if the level of water is average, that is an indication of a good rain. Before the pooja initiates, the Preist’s wife washes his feet and seeks blessings from the priest. During the pooja, people envelop the Sarna place. Dhol, Turhi and Nagara players keep playing along with Priests chanting prayers. The festival goes on for weeks in the region of Chhotanagpur. In the region of Kolhan, the festival is called "Baa Porob" that means Flower Festival.

     

    Karam

    This festival is the worship of Karam devta (God of power as well as youthfulness). Karam festival is held on the 11th of moon in the month of Bhadra. Factions of villagers go to the jungle and accumulate wood, flowers and fruits. These are requisite during the Puja of God Karam. During this period, people dance and sing in groups. The complete valley seems to be boogieing with the drum beat. This festival distinguished by Baiga, Oraon, Majhwar and Binjhwari tribes of Jharkhand.

     

    Jawa

    This festival is held primarily for the anticipation of first-rate fertility and healthier household. The unmarried females beautify a small bin with sprouting seeds. It is supposed that the reverence for good germination of grains would augment the productivity. The girls present green melons to deity as a representation of 'son' which divulges the prehistoric anticipation of human being. The whole tribal region of Jharkhand grows to be tipsy during this time.

     

    Makar or Tusu Parab

    This festival is typically seen in the region between Tama, Raidih and Bundu area of Jharkhand. This girdle has a great history all through the independence movement of India. TUSU is the harvest fiesta held in the winters in the last day of the month of Poush. Unmarried girls ornament a bamboo/wooden frame with colored paper and then present it to the close by mountainous river. However there is no acknowledged history available on this celebration but it has an enormous compilation of dazzling songs full of taste and life.

     

    Hal Punhya

    It is a festival that starts with the fall of winter. The 1st day of month of Magh, recognized as "Hal Punhya" or "Akhain Jatra", well thought-out as the commencement of ploughing. The farmers, to represent this propitious dawn, plough two and a half circles of their farming land this day and also believe it as the figure of good luck.

     

    Bhagta Parab

    This festival falls amid the period of summer and spring. Amongst the ethnic people of Jharkhand, Bhagta Parab is best acknowledged as the reverence of Budha Baba. Throughout the day people are on fast and bear the bathing priest, to the ethnic mandir recognized as Sarana Mandir. After worshipping during dusk, the devotees take part in vigorous and dynamic Chhau dance with heaps of gymnastic masks and actions. The subsequent day is full of primal sports of gallantry. The devotees penetrate hooks on skin & get tied at 1 end of a stretched parallel wooden pole. The other part of the pole which is linked with the rope, towed around the post exhibit the breath - taking dance. This festival is all the rage in Tamar, Jharkhand.

     

    Rohini

    Rohini is possibly the 1st festival of Jharkhand. It is the festival of propagating seeds in the field. Farmers start disseminating seeds from this day however there is no song or dance like other ethnic festivals but just a small number of rituals. There are some festivals like Chitgomha and Rajsawala Ambavati also celebrated with the Rohini festival.

     

    Bandna

    Bandana festival is one of the most eminent festivals distinguished during the black moon of the month of Kartik. Bandna festival is chiefly for the animals. The tribal people are very close with pets and animals. During this festival, people clean, wash, decorate and paint well and put embellishments to their bulls and cows. The song that is dedicated to this festival is known as Ohira which is an acknowledgement for the contribution of animal in their day – to - day life.

     

    Jani - Shikaar

    This festival is held once every twelve years. The women folk wear menswear and walk off for hunting in forests. Jani - Shikaar is carried out in remembrance of driving away the Mohameddens by the women folk of Kurukh in Rohtasgarh, who sought after to capture the fortress on the Sharhul festival.

     

    Chhath Pooja

    Chhath Pooja is a primeval Hindu festival and Vedic Festival committed to Surya (Sun God), also acknowledged as Surya Shashti. The Chhath Puja is implemented so as to show gratitude towards God Surya for supporting life on earth and to appeal the yielding of certain wishes. The Sun, well thought-out to be the god of life - force and energy, is adulated during the festival of Chhath to prop up well - being, affluence and development.

     

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