Jagran Josh Logo

Water Cycles

14-AUG-2015 19:19

    When it rains, the water runs along the ground and flows into rivers or falls directly into the sea. A part of the rainwater that falls on land percolates into the ground. This is stored underground throughout the rest of the year. Water is drawn up from the ground by plants along with the nutrients from the soil. The water is transpired from the leaves as water vapour and returned to the atmosphere. As it is lighter than air, water vapour rises and forms clouds. Winds blow the clouds for long distances and when the clouds rise higher, the vapour condenses and changes into droplets, which fall on the land as rain. Though this is an endless cycle on which life depends, man’s activities are making drastic changes in the atmosphere through pollution which is altering rainfall patterns.

    Jagranjosh

    Evaporation and why it occurs:

    Evaporation is the process by which water changes from a liquid to a gas or vapor. Evaporation is the primary pathway that water moves from the liquid state back into the water cycle as atmospheric water vapor. Studies have shown that the oceans, seas, lakes, and rivers provide nearly 90 percent of the moisture in our atmosphere via evaporation, with the remaining 10 percent being contributed by plant transpiration.

    Jagranjosh

    Transpiration: The release of water from plant leaves

    Transpiration is the process by which moisture is carried through plants from roots to small pores on the underside of leaves, where it changes to vapor and is released to the atmosphere. Transpiration is essentially evaporation of water from plant leaves. It is estimated that about 10 percent of the moisture found in the atmosphere is released by plants through transpiration.

    Plant transpiration is an invisible process—since the water is evaporating from the leaf surfaces, you don't just go out and see the leaves "breathing". During a growing season, a leaf will transpire many times more water than its own weight. A large oak tree can transpire 40,000 gallons (151,000 liters) per year.

    Jagranjosh

    Condensation: The process by which water is changed from vapor to liquid

    Condensation is the process in which water vapor in the air is changed into liquid water. Condensation is crucial to the water cycle because it is responsible for the formation of clouds. These clouds may produce precipitation, which is the primary route for water to return to the Earth's surface within the water cycle. Condensation is the opposite of evaporation.

    You don't have to look at something as far away as a cloud to notice condensation, though. Condensation is responsible for ground-level fog, for your glasses fogging up when you go from a cold room to the outdoors on a hot, humid day, for the water that drips off the outside of your glass of iced tea, and for the water on the inside of your home windows on a cold day.

    Jagranjosh

    Precipitation: The discharge of water, in liquid or solid state, out of the atmosphere, generally upon a land or water surface

    Precipitation is water released from clouds in the form of rain, freezing rain, sleet, snow, or hail. It is the primary connection in the water cycle that provides for the delivery of atmospheric water to the Earth. Most precipitation falls as rain.

    Jagranjosh

    The clouds floating overhead contain water vapor and cloud droplets, which are small drops of condensed water. These droplets are way too small to fall as precipitation, but they are large enough to form visible clouds. Water is continually evaporating and condensing in the sky. If you look closely at a cloud you can see some parts disappearing (evaporating) while other parts are growing (condensation). Most of the condensed water in clouds does not fall as precipitation because their fall speed is not large enough to overcome updrafts which support the clouds. For precipitation to happen, first tiny water droplets must condense on even tinier dust, salt, or smoke particles, which act as a nucleus. Water droplets may grow as a result of additional condensation of water vapor when the particles collide. If enough collisions occur to produce a droplet with a fall velocity which exceeds the cloud updraft speed, then it will fall out of the cloud as precipitation. This is not a trivial task since millions of cloud droplets are required to produce a single raindrop.

     

      Latest Videos

      Register to get FREE updates

        All Fields Mandatory
      • (Ex:9123456789)
      • Please Select Your Interest
      • Please specify

      • By clicking on Submit button, you agree to our terms of use
        ajax-loader
      • A verifcation code has been sent to
        your mobile number

        Please enter the verification code below

      Newsletter Signup
      Follow us on